3rd grade mail

halloweenpostcard

Happy Halloween!

I just got back from my kids’ school where students and staff are dressed up for Halloween, I mean, Character Day. That’s what they call it and everyone is supposed to dress up as a character from a book, maybe to include children who don’t celebrate Halloween and to make it educational? Semantics. In any case, this year’s Halloween should be called National Elsa Day because she is everywhere!

Speaking of school children, my son’s friend’s 3rd grade class is trying to see how many postcards they can get from around the country and the world. If you are a VSM reader from outside of New York State, can you please send a postcard to the class with one fact about your location written on it? That would be excellent! Thank you!

Please send your postcard to:

Class 3-412, P.S. 10, 511 7th Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11215

Viva Childhood!

crossing brooklyn

commons

The Crossing Brooklyn show at the Brooklyn Museum is worth a visit. One of my favorites is Paul Ramirez JonasThe Commons. The piece conjures the kind of historic bronze statue you might see in a town square but the horse has no war hero in its saddle and the whole statue is covered in cork board. Visitors are encouraged to pin things up. Pin something up? Don’t mind if I do.

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Jonas combines two things associated with public space; static, war memorializing monuments and active, interactive community bulletin boards. His piece stirred up thoughts about the past and the future of “The Commons” and the potential of non digital social networks that exist in real, shared time and real, shared space. I loved it.

Plus while I was visiting the exhibit I saw one of my former pre-school art students on a class field trip and got to watch as he exclaimed, “My tooth fell out!” His teacher took his picture to mark the occasion of losing his first tooth. Pretty fantastic and memorable location for such a rite of passage.

inverted mail

I just received a package from my sister Hope with the Inverted Jenny stamps as postage.

Her enclosed note reads:

As soon as I saw these re-issued Inverted Jenny stamps at the post office, I knew I had to use them to send you some inverted mail. But how do you invert the mail? Answer: mail the negatives from pictures of people hanging upside down.

invertedmail

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I love when there is a relationship between paper mail’s postage and content. And Hope’s concept made me laugh! Inverted on many levels, she even wrote my name upside down on the package! And her card featured a reverse panda, with white rings around its eyes!

I challenge you to buy some Inverted Jenny stamps, and send some inverted mail of your own invention.